2015 ORS 93.915¹
Notice of default
  • contents
  • recordation
  • time of forfeiture
  • interim measures

(1) In the event of a default under a contract for conveyance of real property, a seller who wishes to enforce a forfeiture remedy must give written notice of default by service pursuant to ORCP 7 D(2) and 7 D(3), or by both first class and certified mail with return receipt requested, to the last-known address of the following persons or their legal representatives, if any:

(a) The purchaser.

(b) An occupant of the property.

(c) Any person who has caused to be filed for record in the county clerk’s office of a county in which any part or parcel of the real property is situated, a duly acknowledged request for a copy of any notice of default served upon or mailed to the purchaser. The request shall contain the name and address of the person requesting copies of the notice and shall identify the contract by stating the names of the parties to the contract, the date of recordation of the contract and the book and page where the contract is recorded. The county clerk shall immediately make a cross-reference of the request to the contract, either on the margin of the page where the contract is recorded or in some other suitable place. No request, statement or notation placed on the record pursuant to this section shall affect title to the property or be deemed notice to any person that any person so recording the request has any right, title, interest in, lien or charge upon the property referred to in the contract.

(2) Notices served by mail are effective when mailed.

(3) The notice shall specify the nature of the default, the amount of the default if the default is in the payment terms, the date after which the contract will be forfeited if the purchaser does not cure the default and the name and address of the seller or the attorney for the seller. The period specified in the notice after which the contract will be forfeited may not be less than:

(a) Sixty days, when the purchaser has reduced the unpaid balance to an amount greater than 75 percent of the purchase price;

(b) Ninety days, when the purchaser has reduced the unpaid balance to an amount which is more than 50 percent but less than 75 percent of the purchase price; or

(c) One hundred twenty days, when the purchaser has reduced the unpaid balance to an amount which is 50 percent or less of the purchase price.

(4) The seller shall cause to be recorded in the real property records of each county in which any part of the property is located a copy of the notice, together with an affidavit of service or mailing of the notice of default, reciting the date the notice was served or mailed and the name and address of each person to whom it was given. From the date of recording, the notice and affidavit shall constitute constructive notice to third persons of the pending forfeiture. If, not later than one year after the time for cure stated in a recorded notice and affidavit or any recorded extension thereof, no declaration of forfeiture based upon the recorded notice and affidavit has been recorded and no extension of time for cure executed by the seller has been recorded, the notice and affidavit shall not be effective for any purpose nor shall it impart any constructive or other notice to third persons acquiring an interest in the purchaser’s interest in the contract or the property or any portion of either. Any extension of time for cure executed by the seller shall be recorded in the same manner as the original notice and affidavit.

(5) The statement contained in the notice as to the time after which the contract will be forfeited if the default is not cured shall conclusively be presumed to be correct, and the notice adequate, unless one or more recipients of such notice notifies the seller or the attorney for the seller, by registered or certified mail, that such recipient claims the right to a longer period of time in which to cure the default.

(6) Subject to the procedural requirements of the Oregon Rules of Civil Procedure, an action may be instituted to appoint a receiver or to obtain a temporary restraining order during forfeiture under a land sale contract, except that a receiver shall not be appointed with respect to a single-family residence which is occupied at the time the notice of default is given, as the principal residence of the purchaser, the purchaser’s spouse or the purchaser’s minor dependent children. [1985 c.718 §3; 1987 c.717 §1; 1991 c.12 §1]

Notes of Decisions

Notice of default sent to per­son holding power of attorney for purchaser was sufficient. Ho v. Presbyterian Church of Laurelhurst, 116 Or App 115, 840 P2d 1340 (1992), Sup Ct review denied

Where re­quired in­for­ma­­tion not stated directly in notice could be readily determined from in­for­ma­­tion given, notice was sufficient. Ho v. Presbyterian Church of Laurelhurst, 116 Or App 115, 840 P2d 1340 (1982), Sup Ct review denied; Carroll v. Newcomb, 132 Or App 526, 888 P2d 1062 (1995)

Where plaintiff notified defaulting defendant of plaintiff's intent to enforce forfeiture remedy and dead­line to cure default, and defendant received notice and did not claim extension of time in which to cure default, this sec­tion presumes plaintiff's dead­line is correct and notice of default is legally adequate. Harvey v. Davis, 276 Or App 680, 371 P3d 1208 (2016)

Law Review Cita­tions

22 WLR 379 (1986)

Chapter 93

Atty. Gen. Opinions

Records involving title to real prop­erty registered under the Torrens system, (1972) Vol 35, p 1032


1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 93—Conveyancing and Recording, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors093.­html (2015) (last ac­cessed Jul. 16, 2016).
 
2 Legislative Counsel Committee, Annotations to the Oregon Revised Stat­utes, Cumulative Supplement - 2015, Chapter 93, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ano093.­html (2015) (last ac­cessed Jul. 16, 2016).
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.