2017 ORS 86.812¹
Impermissible conditions for approving short sale or sale of note
  • exceptions

(1) As used in this section, “nonprofit entity” means a nonprofit corporation that is organized in this state and that is exempt from taxation under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code, or a subsidiary or agent of the nonprofit corporation.

(2) Except as provided in subsection (3) of this section, a beneficiary may not, as a condition of offering or approving a short sale as an alternative to foreclosing a residential trust deed, require a nonprofit entity that purchases property that is subject to the residential trust deed from a grantor in a short sale, or that purchases a note from the beneficiary that secures the grantor’s obligation to the beneficiary by means of the residential trust deed, to enter into an agreement with the beneficiary or the grantor that limits or bars the grantor, after the short sale or the sale of the note, from owning or occupying the property that is subject to the residential trust deed.

(3) Subsection (2) of this section does not apply if:

(a) The beneficiary does not receive notice before the short sale that the nonprofit entity or the grantor intends for the grantor to continue after the short sale to own or occupy the property that is the subject of the short sale;

(b) The grantor does not allow the beneficiary reasonable access to the property that is the subject of the short sale for the purpose of inspecting or appraising the property;

(c) Offering or approving the short sale would require the beneficiary to breach a contractual obligation to another person with respect to a residential trust deed that was recorded before July 19, 2013; or

(d) Offering or approving the short sale would require the beneficiary to breach a legal obligation that is not based on a contract. [2013 c.625 §2]

1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 86—Mortgages; Trust Deeds, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors086.­html (2017) (last ac­cessed Mar. 30, 2018).
 
2 OregonLaws.org contains the con­tents of Volume 21 of the ORS, inserted along­side the per­tin­ent statutes. See the preface to the ORS An­no­ta­tions for more information.
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.