2017 ORS 86.240¹
Limit on amount required in security protection escrow account
  • compliance with federal laws for certain loans as compliance with state laws

(1) No lender, in connection with a real estate loan agreement, shall require a borrower or prospective borrower:

(a) To deposit in any escrow account which may be established in connection with the agreement, prior to or upon the date of settlement, a sum in excess of the estimated total amount of property taxes, insurance premiums, and similar charges which actually will be due and payable on the date of settlement, and the pro rata portion thereof which has accrued, plus one-sixth of the estimated total amount of the charges which will become due and payable during the 12-month period beginning on the date of settlement; or

(b) To deposit in any escrow account, which may be established in connection with the agreement, in any month beginning after the date of settlement a sum in excess of one-sixth of the total amount of estimated property taxes, insurance premiums or similar charges which will become due and payable during the 12-month period beginning on the first day of the month, except that in the event the lender determines there will be a deficiency on the due date, the lender shall not be prohibited from requiring additional monthly deposits in the escrow account of pro rata portions of the deficiency corresponding to the number of months from the date of the lender’s determination of the deficiency to the date upon which the charges become due and payable.

(2) For real estate loan agreements subject to the federal Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act of 1974 (12 U.S.C. 2601 et seq.) and to Regulation X of the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development (24 C.F.R. 3500.1 et seq.), compliance with the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act and with Regulation X shall be considered to be compliance with this section. [1975 c.337 §13; 1995 c.182 §1]

1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 86—Mortgages; Trust Deeds, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors086.­html (2017) (last ac­cessed Mar. 30, 2018).
 
2 OregonLaws.org contains the con­tents of Volume 21 of the ORS, inserted along­side the per­tin­ent statutes. See the preface to the ORS An­no­ta­tions for more information.
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.