2015 ORS 807.062¹
Domicile or residency requirement for driver license

(1) Unless otherwise specifically provided by law, in order to be eligible for a driver license or permit issued by this state a person must be domiciled in or resident of this state.

(2) Unless otherwise specifically provided by law, a person who is a resident of this state may not operate a motor vehicle in this state unless the person receives a driver license or permit from the Department of Transportation.

(3) For purposes of this section, "domicile" has the meaning given in ORS 803.355 ("Domicile" described).

(4) For purposes of this section, a person is a resident of this state if the person engages in any gainful employment in this state or takes any action to indicate the acquiring of residence in this state. Action to acquire residence includes, but is not limited to, doing any of the following:

(a) Remaining in this state for a consecutive period of six months or more regardless of the domicile of the person.

(b) Placing children in a public school without payment of nonresident tuition fees.

(c) Making a declaration to be a resident of this state for the purpose of obtaining, at resident rates, a state license or tuition fees at an educational institution maintained by public funds.

(5) Notwithstanding subsection (4) of this section, a person who is gainfully employed in this state shall not be considered a resident of the state if the person has taken no other steps to become a resident. This section applies, but is not limited to, a student at an educational institution maintained by public funds who is paying nonresident tuition rates. [1993 c.751 §33]


1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 807—Driving Privileges and Identification Cards, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors807.­html (2015) (last ac­cessed Jul. 16, 2016).
 
2 OregonLaws.org contains the con­tents of Volume 21 of the ORS, inserted along­side the per­tin­ent statutes. See the preface to the ORS An­no­ta­tions for more information.
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.