2015 ORS 801.220¹
"Crosswalk"

"Crosswalk" means any portion of a roadway at an intersection or elsewhere that is distinctly indicated for pedestrian crossing by lines or other markings on the surface of the roadway that conform in design to the standards established for crosswalks under ORS 810.200 (Uniform standards for traffic control devices). Whenever marked crosswalks have been indicated, such crosswalks and no other shall be deemed lawful across such roadway at that intersection. Where no marked crosswalk exists, a crosswalk is that portion of the roadway described in the following:

(1) Where sidewalks, shoulders or a combination thereof exists, a crosswalk is the portion of a roadway at an intersection, not more than 20 feet in width as measured from the prolongation of the lateral line of the roadway toward the prolongation of the adjacent property line, that is included within:

(a) The connections of the lateral lines of the sidewalks, shoulders or a combination thereof on opposite sides of the street or highway measured from the curbs or, in the absence of curbs, from the edges of the traveled roadway; or

(b) The prolongation of the lateral lines of a sidewalk, shoulder or both, to the sidewalk or shoulder on the opposite side of the street, if the prolongation would meet such sidewalk or shoulder.

(2) If there is neither sidewalk nor shoulder, a crosswalk is the portion of the roadway at an intersection, measuring not less than six feet in width, that would be included within the prolongation of the lateral lines of the sidewalk, shoulder or both on the opposite side of the street or highway if there were a sidewalk. [1983 c.338 §36]

Notes of Decisions

Under Former Similar Statute

When sidewalks on opposite sides of street have different widths when lateral lines are connected, unmarked crosswalk takes shape of trapezoid. Rosen v. Wright, 74 Or App 83, 701 P2d 785 (1985)

  • Herald and News / Shelby King, Aug 20, 2011
    “When Jessica Palmer uses the crosswalk on Washburn Way with her three children, she doesn't assume motorists will obey the law. . . . ”

1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 801—General Provisions and Definitions for Oregon Vehicle Code, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors801.­html (2015) (last ac­cessed Jul. 16, 2016).
 
2 Legislative Counsel Committee, Annotations to the Oregon Revised Stat­utes, Cumulative Supplement - 2015, Chapter 801, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ano801.­html (2015) (last ac­cessed Jul. 16, 2016).
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.