2015 ORS 746.140¹
Sale of life insurance with securities
  • written proposal
  • application of securities law

(1) Every insurer or insurance producer soliciting an offer to buy or selling life insurance in correlation with the sale of securities shall furnish the prospect with a clear and unambiguous written proposal prior to the signing of the application by the applicant.

(2) The written proposal shall be dated and signed by the insurance producer, or by the insurer if no insurance producer is involved, and left with the prospect. The written proposal shall be on a form which has been filed with the Director of the Department of Consumer and Business Services. If a sale is made of both life insurance and securities, a duplicate copy of the written proposal left with the buyer shall be retained by the insurer for a period of not less than three years.

(3) Each such proposal shall:

(a) State the name of the insurer in which the life insurance is to be written;

(b) State that the prospect has the right to purchase the life insurance only, the securities only or both the life insurance and the securities;

(c) Contain no misrepresentations or false, deceptive or misleading words, figures or statements;

(d) State all material facts without which the proposal would have the capacity or tendency to mislead or deceive; and

(e) Set forth all matters pertaining to life insurance, including premium charges, separately from matters not pertaining to life insurance.

(4) This section shall not be construed to affect the application of any other provision of law concerning or regulating securities. [Formerly 739.562; 2003 c.364 §139]


1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 746—Trade Practices, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors746.­html (2015) (last ac­cessed Jul. 16, 2016).
 
2 OregonLaws.org contains the con­tents of Volume 21 of the ORS, inserted along­side the per­tin­ent statutes. See the preface to the ORS An­no­ta­tions for more information.
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.