2017 ORS 744.369¹
Unlawful life settlement contract actions

(1) With respect to a life settlement contract or insurance policy, it is unlawful for a life settlement broker to knowingly solicit an offer from, effectuate a life settlement contract with or make a sale to a life settlement provider, financing entity or related provider trust that is controlling, controlled by or under common control with a life settlement broker, unless that relationship is disclosed to the owner.

(2) With respect to a life settlement contract or insurance policy, it is unlawful for a life settlement broker to knowingly enter into a life settlement contract with an owner if, in connection with the life settlement contract, anything of value will be paid to a life settlement broker that is controlling, controlled by or under common control with a life settlement provider, financing entity or related provider trust that is involved in the settlement contract, unless that relationship is disclosed to the owner.

(3) A person may not issue, solicit, market or otherwise promote the purchase of an insurance policy for the purpose of, or with an emphasis on, settling the policy.

(4) A person may not enter into a premium finance arrangement under which the person receives any proceeds, fees or other consideration, directly or indirectly, from the proceeds of the policy, from the owner of the policy or from any other person with respect to the premium finance agreement, the life settlement contract or any other transaction related to the policy that are in addition to the amounts required to pay the principal, interest and service charges related to the policy premiums under the premium finance agreement or subsequent sale of the agreement. Any payments, charges, fees or other amounts in addition to the amounts required to pay the principal, interest and service charges related to policy premiums paid under the premium finance agreement must be remitted to the original owner of the policy or the original owner’s estate if the original owner is not living at the time of the determination of overpayment.

(5) In the solicitation, application or issuance of a life insurance policy, a person may not employ any device, scheme or artifice in violation of ORS 743.040 (Personal insurance, insurable interest and beneficiaries).

(6) A life settlement provider may not enter into a life settlement contract unless the life settlement promotional, advertising and marketing materials, as may be prescribed by regulation, have been filed with the Director of the Department of Consumer and Business Services.

(7) A life insurance producer, insurance company, life settlement broker, life settlement provider or life settlement investment agent may not make any statement or representation to the applicant or policyholder in connection with the sale or financing of a life insurance policy to the effect that the insurance is free or without cost to the policyholder for any period of time unless provided in the policy.

(8) A person may not present, cause to be presented or prepare with the knowledge or belief that it will be presented to or by a life settlement provider, life settlement broker, life settlement purchaser, life settlement investment agent, financing entity, insurer, insurance producer or any other person, false material information, or conceal material information, as part of, in support of or concerning a fact material to one or more of the following:

(a) An application for the issuance of a life settlement contract or insurance policy;

(b) The underwriting of a life settlement contract or insurance policy;

(c) A claim for payment or benefit pursuant to a life settlement contract or insurance policy;

(d) Premiums paid on an insurance policy, or as a result of a life settlement purchase agreement;

(e) Payments and changes in ownership or beneficiary made in accordance with the terms of a life settlement contract, life settlement purchase agreement or insurance policy;

(f) The reinstatement or conversion of an insurance policy;

(g) The solicitation, offer, effectuation or sale of a life settlement contract, insurance policy or life settlement purchase agreement;

(h) The issuance of written evidence of a life settlement contract, life settlement purchase agreement or insurance; or

(i) A financing transaction.

(9) A person may not employ any plan, financial structure, device, scheme or artifice to defraud related to settled policies.

(10) A person may not enter into any practice or plan that involves stranger-originated life insurance.

(11) A person may not fail to disclose to the insurer when requested by the insurer that the prospective insured has undergone a life expectancy evaluation by any person or entity other than the insurer or its authorized representatives in connection with the issuance of the policy.

(12) A person may not, and may not permit employees or agents to:

(a) Remove, conceal, alter, destroy or sequester from the director the assets or records of a licensee or other person engaged in the business of life settlements;

(b) Misrepresent or conceal the financial condition of a licensee, financing entity, insurer or other person;

(c) Transact the business of life settlements in violation of laws requiring a license, certificate of authority or other legal authority for the transaction of the business of life settlements; or

(d) File with the director or the equivalent chief insurance regulatory official of another jurisdiction a document containing false information or otherwise conceal information about a material fact from the director.

(13) A person may not embezzle, steal, misappropriate or convert moneys, funds, premiums, credits or other property of a life settlement provider, insurer, insured, owner, insurance policyowner or any other person engaged in the business of life settlements or insurance.

(14) A person may not recklessly enter into, negotiate, broker or otherwise deal in a life settlement contract, the subject of which is a life insurance policy that was obtained by presenting false information concerning any fact material to the policy or by concealing, for the purpose of misleading another, information concerning any fact material to the policy, for which the person or the persons intended to defraud the policy’s issuer, the life settlement provider or the owner. For the purposes of this subsection, “recklessly” means engaging in conduct in conscious and clearly unjustifiable disregard of a substantial likelihood of the existence of the relevant facts or risks, such disregard involving a gross deviation from acceptable standards of conduct.

(15) A person may not facilitate the change of state of ownership of a policy or certificate or the state of residency of an owner to a state or jurisdiction that does not have a law similar to ORS 744.318 (Definitions for ORS 744.318 to 744.384) to 744.384 (Rules), 744.991 (Criminal penalties) and 744.992 (Civil penalties) for the express purposes of evading or avoiding the provisions of ORS 744.318 (Definitions for ORS 744.318 to 744.384) to 744.384 (Rules), 744.991 (Criminal penalties) and 744.992 (Civil penalties).

(16) A person may not attempt to commit, assist, aid or abet in the commission of, or conspire to commit the acts or omissions specified in, this subsection.

(17) A life settlement investment agent shall not have any contact, directly or indirectly, with the owner or insured under the policy or have knowledge of the identity of the owner or insured. [2009 c.711 §15]

1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 744—Insurance Producers; Life Settlement Providers, Brokers and Contracts; Adjusters; Consultants; Third Party Administrators; Reinsurance Intermediaries; Limited Licenses, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors744.­html (2017) (last ac­cessed Mar. 30, 2018).
 
2 OregonLaws.org contains the con­tents of Volume 21 of the ORS, inserted along­side the per­tin­ent statutes. See the preface to the ORS An­no­ta­tions for more information.
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.