2015 ORS 659A.093¹
Employer required to provide leave
  • job protection
  • benefits
  • notice to employer
  • use of accrued leave
  • rules

(1) During a period of military conflict, an employee who is a spouse of a member of the Armed Forces of the United States, the National Guard or the military reserve forces of the United States who has been notified of an impending call or order to active duty or who has been deployed is entitled to a total of 14 days of unpaid leave per deployment after the military spouse has been notified of an impending call or order to active duty and before deployment and when the military spouse is on leave from deployment.

(2) An employee who takes leave authorized under this section is entitled to be restored to a position of employment and to the continuation of benefits as provided in ORS 659A.171 (Job protection).

(3) An employee who intends to take leave as authorized under this section must provide the employer with notice of the intention to take leave within five business days of receiving official notice of an impending call or order to active duty or of a leave from deployment.

(4) An employee who takes leave authorized under this section may elect to substitute any accrued leave to which the employee is entitled for any part of the leave provided under this section.

(5) Leave taken under this section shall be included in the total amount of leave authorized under ORS 659A.162 (Length of leave).

(6) The Bureau of Labor and Industries may adopt rules necessary for the implementation and administration of ORS 659A.090 (Definitions for ORS 659A.090 to 659A.099) to 659A.099 (Short title). [2009 c.559 §4]


1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 659A—Unlawful Discrimination in Employment, Public Accommodations, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors659A.­html (2015) (last ac­cessed Jul. 16, 2016).
 
2 OregonLaws.org contains the con­tents of Volume 21 of the ORS, inserted along­side the per­tin­ent statutes. See the preface to the ORS An­no­ta­tions for more information.
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.