2015 ORS 609.341¹
Permit requirement for keeping of exotic animal
  • breeding of animal

(1) A person may not keep an exotic animal in this state unless the person possesses a valid State Department of Agriculture permit for that animal issued prior to January 1, 2010, or issued as provided in ORS 609.351 (Issuance and renewal of exotic animal permit).

(2) Except as provided in subsection (4) of this section, a person keeping an exotic animal in this state may not breed that animal.

(3) A person may not keep an exotic animal in this state for more than 30 days after the expiration, revocation or suspension of a permit.

(4)(a) A person may breed a small exotic feline if the person:

(A) Is exempt from the requirements for a permit under ORS 609.345 (Exceptions to permit requirement); or

(B) Breeds a small exotic feline with a member of the species Felis catus (domestic cat), and:

(i) The person has a permit issued by the State Department of Agriculture under ORS 609.351 (Issuance and renewal of exotic animal permit); and

(ii) The person provides written documentation, including the person’s business license, that the person bred the animals for the purpose of retail sale of the offspring.

(b) As used in this subsection, "small exotic feline" means a member of the family Felidae, except the species Felis catus (domestic cat), that weighs 50 pounds or less when fully mature. [Formerly 609.319]

Chapter 609

Atty. Gen. Opinions

Possession and ad­min­is­tra­­tion of sodium pentobarbital by county animal control program, (1982) Vol 42, p 297


1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 609—Dogs; Exotic Animals; Dealers, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors609.­html (2015) (last ac­cessed Jul. 16, 2016).
 
2 Legislative Counsel Committee, Annotations to the Oregon Revised Stat­utes, Cumulative Supplement - 2015, Chapter 609, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ano609.­html (2015) (last ac­cessed Jul. 16, 2016).
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.