2015 ORS 576.325¹
Levy and collection of assessments
  • commission rules regulating sale activities
  • maximum assessment rates

(1) As used in this section, "industry average unit price" means the average unit price for the raw commodity within the industry. Unless provided otherwise, "industry average unit price" includes prices that are calculated using a one-year, two-year or three-year average and data from the most recent complete year or years preceding the year of determination.

(2)(a) A commodity commission may assess, levy and collect an assessment, the amount of which the commission shall determine, on all units or animals of the commodity grown or produced in this state, or procured from this state’s rivers or the offshore waters, but not the Columbia River, for handling within this state, and sold in commercial channels. A commission may not apply an assessment to a transaction that occurred prior to the effective date of the commission rule adopting the assessment.

(b) A commission may assess, levy and collect a differential assessment, the amount of which the commission shall determine, based on the intended use, type or variety of the commodity.

(c) All casual sales of the commodity made by the producer direct to the consumer are exempt from the assessment.

(d) A commission may, by rule, define and regulate handling, processing and casual sales.

(3) The amount of the assessment provided for in subsection (2) of this section is limited as follows:

(a) If a commission assesses on a unit basis, the assessment may not exceed one and one-half percent of the industry average unit price. The commission may determine the industry average unit price by considering data and estimates of the United States Department of Agriculture, Oregon State University or other reliable sources.

(b) If a commission assesses on a percentage of dollar value basis, the assessment may not exceed one and one-half percent of the dollar value received by a producer for the raw commodity. If the dollar value received by a producer is not otherwise determinable, the commission may establish the dollar value based on the industry average unit price for that year for the raw commodity.

(4) Notwithstanding subsection (3) of this section:

(a) The maximum assessment by the Oregon Clover Seed Commission may not exceed one and one-half percent of the industry average unit price for products within the same market category, if assessed on a unit basis.

(b) The maximum assessments by the Oregon Albacore Commission, the Oregon Orchardgrass Seed Producers Commission and the Oregon Tall Fescue Commission may not exceed three percent of the industry average unit price if assessed on a unit basis or three percent of the value received by a producer for the raw commodity if assessed on a percentage of dollar value basis.

(c) The maximum assessment by the Oregon Sweet Cherry Commission for fresh, brined, canned and frozen cherries may not exceed four percent of the respective industry average unit prices for fresh, brined, canned and frozen cherries if assessed on a unit basis.

(d) The maximum assessment by the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission on a commodity may not exceed 0.5 percent of the industry average unit price for that commodity if assessed on a unit basis or 0.5 percent of the dollar value received by a producer for the commodity if assessed on a percentage of dollar value basis.

(e) The maximum assessment by the Oregon Hop Commission may not exceed two percent of the industry average unit price if assessed on a unit basis.

(f) The assessment by the Oregon Sheep Commission may not be less than $0.50 or more than $1 per head. The commission may not increase the assessment by more than $0.10 during any 12-month period. Notwithstanding subsection (2) of this section, the commission may levy the assessment on any sheep produced and sold in this state regardless of the disposition of the sheep and regardless of whether the sale is a casual sale. This paragraph does not allow the commission to apply an assessment to a transaction that occurs prior to the effective date of the rule adopting the assessment.

(5) A commission shall assess and levy an assessment under subsections (2) to (4) of this section to the producer at the time and in the manner provided by the commission by rule. The commission is the owner of a collected assessment. A person who collects an assessment holds the assessment in trust for the benefit of the commission and the state and shall remit the assessment in the time and manner required by the commission under ORS 576.335 (Report by person responsible for collecting assessment).

(6) Notwithstanding subsection (5) of this section, a commission may assess, levy and collect an assessment from a first purchaser at the time and in the manner provided by the commission by rule. Except as provided in subsection (8) of this section, the assessment may not exceed the limits described in subsections (3) and (4) of this section.

(7) A regional commission may assess, levy and collect an assessment only on the commodity produced in the counties in which the regional commission functions.

(8) Notwithstanding subsections (3) and (4) of this section, a commodity commission may assess, levy and collect an assessment in excess of the limits described in subsections (3) and (4) of this section pursuant to a federal marketing order or agreement.

(9) A person who believes that the amount of an assessment is incorrect may apply to the commission for a refund not later than 60 days after the person pays the assessment. [1953 c.489 §21; 1957 c.447 §14; 1959 c.596 §13; 1983 c.645 §1; 2001 c.504 §4; 2003 c.604 §39; 2007 c.132 §4; 2013 c.308 §1]


1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 576—Agricultural Marketing Generally, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors576.­html (2015) (last ac­cessed Jul. 16, 2016).
 
2 OregonLaws.org contains the con­tents of Volume 21 of the ORS, inserted along­side the per­tin­ent statutes. See the preface to the ORS An­no­ta­tions for more information.
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.