2017 ORS 56.023¹
Approval of name of entity by Director of Department of Consumer and Business Services required in certain business registry filings
  • exception

(1) If a person seeks to make a business registry filing of a name with the Secretary of State under ORS chapter 58, 60, 62, 63, 65, 67, 70, 554 or 648 or ORS 128.560 (“Business trust” described) to 128.600 (Filing, service, copying and certification fees) that contains the word or words “banc,” “bancorp,” “bank,” “banker,” “banking,” “savings,” “safe deposit,” “trust,” “trustee,” “building and loan” or their equivalents in a language other than English, or a similar word or words in English or an equivalent in a language other than English, implying a business primarily engaged in the lending of money, underwriting or sale of financial products, acting as a depository institution, acting as a financial planner, financial adviser or acting as a loan broker, the Secretary of State may not accept the name for filing without first receiving specific written approval from the Director of the Dep artment of Consumer and Business Services under the provisions of ORS 705.635 (Certificate of approval of certain business registry names filed under ORS 56.023).

(2) The provisions of subsection (1) of this section do not apply if the Secretary of State is satisfied that the name at issue is in a context clearly not purporting to refer to a banking or other financial activity or not likely to mislead the public about the nature of the business or lead to a pattern and practice of abuse that might cause harm to the interests of the public or the State of Oregon as determined by the Secretary of State. [2001 c.315 §42]

1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 56—Duties of Secretary of State, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors056.­html (2017) (last ac­cessed Mar. 30, 2018).
 
2 OregonLaws.org contains the con­tents of Volume 21 of the ORS, inserted along­side the per­tin­ent statutes. See the preface to the ORS An­no­ta­tions for more information.
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.