ORS 51.020¹
Justice of the peace districts
  • establishing and modifying boundaries
  • maximum number of districts

(1) The county court or board of county commissioners of every county may set off and establish, or modify the boundaries of, justice of the peace districts within the county. No more than six justice of the peace districts shall be set off or established or permitted to remain in existence within any county. Except in the counties of Baker, Crook, Gilliam, Grant, Harney, Morrow, Sherman, Tillamook and Wheeler, a justice of the peace district may not include any portion of the city that is the county seat for the county or any portion of a city in which a circuit court regularly holds court. In the counties of Baker, Gilliam, Grant, Harney, Morrow, Sherman, Tillamook and Wheeler, a justice of the peace district in existence on January 15, 1998, may include any portion of the city that is the county seat for the county, or any portion of a city in which a circuit court regularly holds court, until such time as the justice court ceases to provide judicial services within the county seat or city. If the justice court ceases to provide judicial services within the county seat or city, the district that includes portions of the county seat or city shall cease to exist and may not thereafter be reestablished.

(2) At the time that the county court or board of county commissioners of a county sets off and establishes the boundaries of a justice of the peace district, the county court or board of county commissioners may require as a qualification for the office that a person serving as justice of the peace in the district be a member of the Oregon State Bar.

(3) The prohibition of subsection (1) of this section on a justice of the peace district that includes any portion of the city that is the county seat for the county, or any portion of a city in which a circuit court regularly holds court, does not prevent a justice of the peace from conducting an arraignment for a person in custody in the city that is the county seat for the county, or in a city in which a circuit court regularly holds court, if the accusatory instrument for the offense was filed in the justice court and the offense was committed within the boundaries of the justice of the peace district. [Amended by 1965 c.568 §5; 1995 c.658 §53; 1997 c.801 §105; 1999 c.449 §1; 2011 c.420 §1; 2019 c.426 §2]

1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 51—Justice Courts; Jurisdiction, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors051.­html (2019) (last ac­cessed May 16, 2020).
 
2 OregonLaws.org contains the con­tents of Volume 21 of the ORS, inserted along­side the per­tin­ent statutes. See the preface to the ORS An­no­ta­tions for more information.
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent. Currency Information