2017 ORS 496.009¹
“Game fish” defined

As used in the wildlife laws, unless the context requires otherwise, “game fish” means:

(1) Those members of the family Salmonidae, commonly known as trout, steelhead, char, grayling, Atlantic salmon and whitefish.

(2) Those members of the family Salmonidae, commonly known as salmon, when under 15 inches in length or when taken by angling.

(3) Those members of the family Ictaluridae, commonly known as freshwater catfish.

(4) Those members of the family Centrarchidae, commonly known as freshwater bass, sunfish and crappie.

(5) Those members of the family Acipenseridae, commonly known as green sturgeon and white sturgeon, when taken by angling.

(6) Perca flavescens, commonly known as yellow perch.

(7) Stizostedion vitreum, commonly known as walleye.

(8) Catostomus luxatus, commonly known as mullet.

(9) Morone saxatilis, commonly known as striped bass.

(10) Alosa sapidissima, commonly known as American shad, when taken by angling. [1973 c.723 §§5,131; 1999 c.1026 §18]

See annota­tions under ORS 496.010 in permanent edi­tion.

Chapter 496

Notes of Decisions

Fish and Wildlife Commission has statutory authority to provide by rule for is suance of special ceremonial hunting permits for specific tribes that are not otherwise allowed under hunting and fishing agree­ment between federal and state govern­ments and that tribe. Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians of Oregon v. Depart­ment of Fish and Wildlife, 244 Or App 535, 260 P3d 705 (2011)

Atty. Gen. Opinions

Commission authority to restrict use of boat ramp it locates on state land, (1971) Vol 35, p 900

1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 496—Application, Administration and Enforcement of Wildlife Laws, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors496.­html (2017) (last ac­cessed Mar. 30, 2018).
 
2 Legislative Counsel Committee, Annotations to the Oregon Revised Stat­utes, Cumulative Supplement - 2017, Chapter 496, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ano496.­html (2017) (last ac­cessed Mar. 30, 2018).
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.