2017 ORS 475.894¹
Unlawful possession of methamphetamine

(1) It is unlawful for any person knowingly or intentionally to possess methamphetamine unless the substance was obtained directly from, or pursuant to, a valid prescription or order of a practitioner while acting in the course of professional practice, or except as otherwise authorized by ORS 475.005 (Definitions for ORS 475.005 to 475.285 and 475.752 to 475.980) to 475.285 (Short title) and 475.752 (Prohibited acts generally) to 475.980 (Affirmative defense to ORS 475.969, 475.971, 475.975 (1) and 475.976 (1)).

(2)(a) Unlawful possession of methamphetamine is a Class A misdemeanor.

(b) Notwithstanding paragraph (a) of this subsection, unlawful possession of methamphetamine is a Class C felony if:

(A) The person possesses a usable quantity of methamphetamine and:

(i) At the time of the possession, the person has a prior felony conviction;

(ii) At the time of the possession, the person has two or more prior convictions for unlawful possession of a usable quantity of a controlled substance; or

(iii) The possession is a commercial drug offense under ORS 475.900 (Crime category classification) (1)(b); or

(B) The person possesses two grams or more of a mixture or substance containing a detectable amount of methamphetamine. [2005 c.708 §18; 2017 c.706 §15]

Chapter 475

Law Review Cita­tions

51 OLR 561 (1972); 69 OLR 171 (1990)

1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 475—Controlled Substances; Illegal Drug Cleanup; Miscellaneous Drugs; Paraphernalia; Precursors, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors475.­html (2017) (last ac­cessed Mar. 30, 2018).
 
2 Legislative Counsel Committee, Annotations to the Oregon Revised Stat­utes, Cumulative Supplement - 2017, Chapter 475, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ano475.­html (2017) (last ac­cessed Mar. 30, 2018).
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.