2017 ORS 441.403¹
Office of Long Term Care Ombudsman
  • terms
  • appointment
  • confirmation
  • qualifications

(1) The office of the Long Term Care Ombudsman is established. The Long Term Care Ombudsman shall function separately and independently from any other state agency. The Governor shall appoint the Long Term Care Ombudsman for a four-year term from a list of three nominees nominated by the Residential Ombudsman and Public Guardianship Advisory Board established under ORS 441.416 (Residential Ombudsman and Public Guardianship Advisory Board). The appointment of the Long Term Care Ombudsman is subject to Senate confirmation under ORS 171.562 (Procedures for confirmation) and 171.565 (Vote required for confirmation). A vacancy shall be filled within 60 days in the same manner as an appointment is made.

(2) The Long Term Care Ombudsman may be removed for just cause, upon recommendation to the Governor by the Residential Ombudsman and Public Guardianship Advisory Board.

(3) The Long Term Care Ombudsman shall have background and experience in the following areas:

(a) The fields of aging, mental health or developmental disabilities;

(b) Physical or behavioral health care;

(c) Working with community programs;

(d) Strong understanding of long term care issues, both regulatory and policy;

(e) Working with health care providers;

(f) Working with and involvement in volunteer programs; and

(g) Administrative and managerial experience. [Formerly 441.103; 2017 c.441 §11]

Chapter 441

Atty. Gen. Opinions

Licensing and phantom beds, (1970) Vol 40, p 171; a hospital’s employing a licensed physical therapist as unauthorized practice, (1975) Vol 37, p 963

1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 441—Health Care Facilities, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors441.­html (2017) (last ac­cessed Mar. 30, 2018).
 
2 Legislative Counsel Committee, Annotations to the Oregon Revised Stat­utes, Cumulative Supplement - 2017, Chapter 441, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ano441.­html (2017) (last ac­cessed Mar. 30, 2018).
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.