2017 ORS 433.133¹
Court hearing and order for release from isolation or quarantine or for remedy for breach of required conditions of isolation or quarantine

(1)(a) Any person or group of persons who is isolated or quarantined pursuant to ORS 433.121 (Emergency administrative order for isolation or quarantine) or 433.123 (Petition for court order for isolation or quarantine) may apply to the circuit court for an order to show cause why the individual or group should not be released.

(b) The court shall rule on the application to show cause within 48 hours of the filing of the application.

(c) The court shall grant the application if there is a reasonable basis to support the allegations in the application, and the court shall schedule a hearing on the order requiring the Public Health Director or local public health administrator to appear and to show cause within five working days of the filing of the application.

(d) The issuance of an order to show cause and ordering the director or local public health administrator to appear and show cause does not stay or enjoin an isolation or quarantine order.

(2)(a) A person or group of persons who is isolated or quarantined may request a hearing in the circuit court for remedies regarding breaches of the conditions of isolation or quarantine required by ORS 433.128 (Conditions of and principles for isolation or quarantine).

(b) The court shall hold a hearing if there is a reasonable basis to believe there has been a breach of the conditions of isolation or quarantine required by ORS 433.128 (Conditions of and principles for isolation or quarantine).

(c) A request for a hearing does not stay or enjoin an order for isolation or quarantine.

(d) Upon receipt of a request under this subsection alleging extraordinary circumstances justifying the immediate granting of relief, the court shall hold a hearing on the matters alleged as soon as practicable.

(e) If a hearing is not granted under paragraph (d) of this subsection, the court shall hold a hearing on the matters alleged within five days from receipt of the request.

(3) In any proceedings brought for relief under this section, in extraordinary circumstances and for good cause shown, or with consent of the petitioner or petitioners the Public Health Director or local public health administrator may move the court to extend the time for a hearing. The court in its discretion may grant the extension giving due regard to the rights of the affected persons, the protection of the public health, the severity of the emergency and the availability of necessary witnesses and evidence.

(4) If a person or group of persons who is detained cannot personally appear before the court because such an appearance poses a risk of serious harm to others, the court proceeding may be conducted by legal counsel for the person or group of persons and be held at a location, or by any means, including simultaneous electronic transmission, that allows all parties to fully participate.

(5) If the court finds, by clear and convincing evidence, that a person or group of persons no longer poses a serious risk to the health and safety to others, the court may order the release of that person or group of persons from isolation or quarantine.

(6) If the court finds by clear and convincing evidence that a person or group of persons is not being held in accordance with the conditions of isolation or quarantine required by ORS 433.128 (Conditions of and principles for isolation or quarantine), the court may order an appropriate remedy to ensure compliance with ORS 433.128 (Conditions of and principles for isolation or quarantine). [2007 c.445 §14; 2009 c.595 §644; 2011 c.721 §6]

1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 433—Disease and Condition Control; Mass Gatherings; Indoor Air, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors433.­html (2017) (last ac­cessed Mar. 30, 2018).
 
2 OregonLaws.org contains the con­tents of Volume 21 of the ORS, inserted along­side the per­tin­ent statutes. See the preface to the ORS An­no­ta­tions for more information.
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.