2015 ORS § 430.765¹

Duty of officials to report abuse
  • exceptions for privileged communications
  • exception for religious practice

(1) Any public or private official who has reasonable cause to believe that any adult with whom the official comes in contact while acting in an official capacity, has suffered abuse, or that any person with whom the official comes in contact while acting in an official capacity has abused an adult shall report or cause a report to be made in the manner required in ORS 430.743 (Abuse report).

(2) Nothing contained in ORS 40.225 (Rule 503. Lawyer-client privilege) to 40.295 (Rule 514. Effect on existing privileges) affects the duty to report imposed by subsections (1) and (2) of this section, except that a psychiatrist, psychologist, member of the clergy or attorney shall not be required to report such information communicated by a person if the communication is privileged under ORS 40.225 (Rule 503. Lawyer-client privilege) to 40.295 (Rule 514. Effect on existing privileges).

(3) An adult who in good faith is voluntarily under treatment solely by spiritual means through prayer in accordance with the tenets and practices of a recognized church or religious denomination by a duly accredited practitioner thereof shall for this reason alone not be considered subjected to abuse under ORS 430.735 (Definitions for ORS 430.735 to 430.765) to 430.765 (Duty of officials to report abuse). [1991 c.744 §§3,11]

Note: See note under 430.735 (Definitions for ORS 430.735 to 430.765).

Atty. Gen. Opinions

Private school tui­tion for handicapped children, (1974) Vol 36, p 942


1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 430—Mental Health; Developmental Disabilities; Alcohol and Drug Treatment Programs, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors430.­html (2015) (last ac­cessed Jul. 16, 2016).
 
2 Legislative Counsel Committee, Annotations to the Oregon Revised Stat­utes, Cumulative Supplement - 2015, Chapter 430, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ano430.­html (2015) (last ac­cessed Jul. 16, 2016).
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.