2015 ORS 419C.542¹
Hearings before juvenile panel of Psychiatric Security Review Board

(1) A young person committed by the court under ORS 419C.529 (Finding of serious mental condition) to a hospital or facility designated by the Department of Human Services or the Oregon Health Authority may not be held in the hospital or facility for more than 90 days from the date of the court’s commitment order without an initial hearing before the juvenile panel of the Psychiatric Security Review Board to determine whether the young person should be discharged or conditionally released.

(2) A young person may not be held pursuant to an order under ORS 419C.532 (Hearings of juvenile panel of Psychiatric Security Review Board) (5) for a period of time exceeding one year without a hearing before the juvenile panel to determine whether the young person should be discharged or conditionally released.

(3) When a young person has spent three years on conditional release, the juvenile panel shall bring the young person before the juvenile panel no later than 30 days after the expiration of the three-year period. The juvenile panel shall review the young person’s status and determine whether the young person should be discharged from the jurisdiction of the board.

(4) Notwithstanding the fact that a young person who is brought before the juvenile panel under subsection (3) of this section continues to have a serious mental condition, the juvenile panel may discharge the young person if the young person did not exhibit behaviors that presented a substantial danger to others during the period of conditional release and no longer requires supervision by the juvenile panel. [2005 c.843 §18; 2009 c.595 §374]


1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 419C—Juvenile Code: Delinquency, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors419C.­html (2015) (last ac­cessed Jul. 16, 2016).
 
2 OregonLaws.org contains the con­tents of Volume 21 of the ORS, inserted along­side the per­tin­ent statutes. See the preface to the ORS An­no­ta­tions for more information.
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.