2015 ORS 419B.231¹
Appointment
  • hearing
  • findings

(1) In a proceeding under this chapter, including a proceeding for the termination of parental rights, the court, on its own motion or on the written or oral motion of a party in the proceeding, may appoint a guardian ad litem for a parent involved in the proceeding as provided in this section.

(2) The court shall conduct a hearing to determine whether to appoint a guardian ad litem in a proceeding under this chapter if:

(a) A party moves for the appointment and the affidavit or oral representations submitted in support of the motion state facts that, if proved at a hearing under this section, would establish that it is more probable than not that:

(A) Due to the parent’s mental or physical disability or impairment, the parent lacks substantial capacity either to understand the nature and consequences of the proceeding or to give direction and assistance to the parent’s attorney on decisions the parent must make in the proceeding; and

(B) The appointment of a guardian ad litem is necessary to protect the parent’s rights in the proceeding during the period of the parent’s disability or impairment; or

(b) The court has a reasonable belief that:

(A) Due to the parent’s mental or physical disability or impairment, the parent lacks substantial capacity either to understand the nature and consequences of the proceeding or to give direction and assistance to the parent’s attorney on decisions the parent must make in the proceeding; and

(B) The appointment of a guardian ad litem is necessary to protect the parent’s rights in the proceeding during the period of the parent’s disability or impairment.

(3)(a) A court may not appoint a guardian ad litem under this section unless the court conducts a hearing. At the hearing, the court may receive testimony, reports and other evidence without regard to whether the evidence is admissible under ORS 40.010 (Rule 100. Short title) to 40.210 (Rule 412. Sex offense cases) and 40.310 (Rule 601. General rule of competency) to 40.585 (Rule 1008. Functions of court and jury) if the evidence is:

(A) Relevant to the findings required under this section; and

(B) Of a type commonly relied upon by reasonably prudent persons in the conduct of their serious affairs.

(b) For purposes of this subsection, evidence is relevant if it is "relevant evidence" as defined in ORS 40.150 (Rule 401. Definition of "relevant evidence").

(4) A court may not appoint a guardian ad litem for a parent unless the court finds by a preponderance of the evidence presented at the hearing that:

(a) Due to the parent’s mental or physical disability or impairment, the parent lacks substantial capacity either to understand the nature and consequences of the proceeding or to give direction and assistance to the parent’s attorney on decisions the parent must make in the proceeding; and

(b) The appointment of a guardian ad litem is necessary to protect the parent’s rights in the proceeding during the period of the parent’s disability or impairment.

(5) The fact that a guardian ad litem has been appointed under this section may not be used as evidence of mental or emotional illness in any juvenile court proceeding, any civil commitment proceeding or any other civil proceeding. [2005 c.450 §2]


1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 419B—Juvenile Code: Dependency, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors419B.­html (2015) (last ac­cessed Jul. 16, 2016).
 
2 OregonLaws.org contains the con­tents of Volume 21 of the ORS, inserted along­side the per­tin­ent statutes. See the preface to the ORS An­no­ta­tions for more information.
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.