2017 ORS 418.246¹
Bond for outdoor youth program licensure

(1) In addition to any requirements for licensure established by the Department of Human Services, each outdoor youth program that is applying for licensure as a child-caring agency shall file with the department a bond in the amount of $50,000 or 50 percent of the program’s yearly budget, whichever amount is less. The bond shall be issued by a surety company or an insured institution, as defined in ORS 706.008 (Additional definitions for Bank Act), authorized to do business in this state.

(2) The bond required under subsection (1) of this section shall be continuous until canceled and shall remain in full force and unimpaired at all times to comply with this section. The surety or insured institution shall give the department at least 30 days’ written notice before it cancels or terminates its liability under the bond.

(3) An action on the bond may be brought by any person aggrieved by the misconduct of an outdoor youth program required to be licensed under ORS 418.205 (Definitions for ORS 418.205 to 418.327, 418.470, 418.475, 418.950 to 418.970 and 418.992 to 418.998) to 418.327 (Licensing of private residential boarding schools). [2001 c.809 §6; 2016 c.106 §8]

Chapter 418

Notes of Decisions

Where plaintiffs brought ac­tion under 42 U.S.C. 1983 alleging viola­tion of federal civil rights after defendant Children’s Services Division employees removed plaintiffs’ child from home following reports of abuse, CSD workers entitled to absolute immunity in investiga­tion, taking child into custody and keeping plaintiffs from visiting child. Tennyson v. Children’s Services Division, 308 Or 80, 775 P2d 1365 (1989)

1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 418—Child Welfare Services, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors418.­html (2017) (last ac­cessed Mar. 30, 2018).
 
2 Legislative Counsel Committee, Annotations to the Oregon Revised Stat­utes, Cumulative Supplement - 2017, Chapter 418, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ano418.­html (2017) (last ac­cessed Mar. 30, 2018).
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.