2017 ORS 305.288¹
Valuation changes for residential property substantial value error or for good and sufficient cause

(1) The tax court shall order a change or correction applicable to a separate assessment of property to the assessment and tax roll for the current tax year or for either of the two tax years immediately preceding the current tax year, or for any or all of those tax years, if all of the following conditions exist:

(a) For the tax year to which the change or correction is applicable, the property was or is used primarily as a dwelling (or is vacant) and was and is a single-family dwelling, a multifamily dwelling of not more than four units, a condominium unit, a manufactured structure or a floating home.

(b) The change or correction requested is a change in value for the property for the tax year and it is asserted in the request and determined by the tax court that the difference between the real market value of the property for the tax year and the real market value on the assessment and tax roll for the tax year is equal to or greater than 20 percent.

(2) If the tax court finds that the conditions needed to order a change or correction under subsection (1) of this section exist, the court may order a change or correction in the maximum assessed value of the property in addition to the change or correction in the real market value of the property.

(3) The tax court may order a change or correction applicable to a separate assessment of property to the assessment or tax roll for the current tax year and for either of the two tax years immediately preceding the current tax year if, for the year to which the change or correction is applicable, the assessor or taxpayer has no statutory right of appeal remaining and the tax court determines that good and sufficient cause exists for the failure by the assessor or taxpayer to pursue the statutory right of appeal.

(4) Before ordering a change or correction to the assessment or tax roll under subsection (3) of this section, the tax court may determine whether any of the conditions exist in a particular case. If the tax court determines that one of the conditions specified does exist, the tax court shall hold a hearing to determine whether to order a change or correction to the roll.

(5) For purposes of this section:

(a) “Current tax year” has the meaning given the term under ORS 306.115 (General supervision over property tax system).

(b) “Good and sufficient cause”:

(A) Means an extraordinary circumstance that is beyond the control of the taxpayer, or the taxpayer’s agent or representative, and that causes the taxpayer, agent or representative to fail to pursue the statutory right of appeal; and

(B) Does not include inadvertence, oversight, lack of knowledge, hardship or reliance on misleading information provided by any person except an authorized tax official providing the relevant misleading information.

(c) “Manufactured structure” has the meaning given that term in ORS 446.561 (Definitions for ORS 446.566 to 446.646).

(6) The remedy provided under this section is in addition to all other remedies provided by law. [Formerly 306.116; 1999 c.767 §1; subsection (7) of 2005 Edition enacted as 2003 c.655 §47a; 2009 c.33 §6; 2013 c.176 §2]

Law Review Cita­tions

48 WLR 147 (2011)

Chapter 305

Notes of Decisions

Policy of efficient and effective tax collec­tion makes doctrine of estoppel against govern­ment in tax cases one of rare applica­tion. Pacific Conference v. Dept. of Rev., 7 OTR 429 (1978)

Law Review Cita­tions

9 WLJ 193-260 (1973); 48 WLR 147 (2011)

1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 305—Administration of Revenue and Tax Laws; Appeals, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors305.­html (2017) (last ac­cessed Mar. 30, 2018).
 
2 Legislative Counsel Committee, Annotations to the Oregon Revised Stat­utes, Cumulative Supplement - 2017, Chapter 305, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ano305.­html (2017) (last ac­cessed Mar. 30, 2018).
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.