2015 ORS 279B.420¹
Judicial review of other violations

(1) If a contracting agency allegedly violates a provision of ORS chapter 279A and a judicial remedy is not otherwise available under ORS chapter 279A, 279B or 279C, the alleged violation is subject to judicial review only as provided in this section.

(2) If a contracting agency allegedly violates a provision of this chapter, except a provision of ORS 279B.030 (Demonstration that procurement will cost less than performing service or that performing service is not feasible), 279B.033 (Contents of cost analysis), 279B.036 (Determination of feasibility of procurement), 279B.270 (State contracting agencies to use recovered resources and recycled materials), 279B.275 (Purchase of goods containing recycled polyethylene material), 279B.280 (Use of recycled products when economically feasible) or 279B.400 (Protests and judicial review of approvals of special procurements) to 279B.425 (Review of prequalification and debarment decisions), and a judicial remedy is not otherwise provided in this chapter or ORS chapter 279A, the alleged violation is subject to judicial review only as provided in this section.

(3) A person may seek judicial review under this section for a violation described in subsection (1) or (2) of this section only if:

(a) A public contract is about to be awarded or has been awarded;

(b) The alleged violation of a provision of this chapter or ORS chapter 279A, except a provision of ORS 279B.030 (Demonstration that procurement will cost less than performing service or that performing service is not feasible), 279B.033 (Contents of cost analysis), 279B.036 (Determination of feasibility of procurement), 279B.270 (State contracting agencies to use recovered resources and recycled materials), 279B.275 (Purchase of goods containing recycled polyethylene material), 279B.280 (Use of recycled products when economically feasible) or 279B.400 (Protests and judicial review of approvals of special procurements) to 279B.425 (Review of prequalification and debarment decisions), occurred in the procurement process for the public contract and the alleged violation resulted in or will result in an unlawful award of a contract or an unlawful failure to award the contract;

(c) The alleged violation deprived the person of the award of the contract or deprived the person of the opportunity to compete for the award of the contract;

(d) The person was qualified to receive the award of the contract under ORS 279B.110 (Responsibility of bidders and proposers);

(e) The person gave written notice that described the alleged violation to the contracting agency not later than 10 days after the date on which the alleged violation occurred and, regardless of when the alleged violation occurred, not later than 10 days after the date of execution of the contract;

(f) The person has exhausted all administrative remedies the contracting agency provides; and

(g)(A) The alleged violation is a violation of a provision of ORS chapter 279A and no other section of ORS chapter 279A, 279B or 279C provides judicial review; or

(B) The alleged violation is a violation of a provision of this chapter, except a provision of ORS 279B.030 (Demonstration that procurement will cost less than performing service or that performing service is not feasible), 279B.033 (Contents of cost analysis), 279B.036 (Determination of feasibility of procurement), 279B.270 (State contracting agencies to use recovered resources and recycled materials), 279B.275 (Purchase of goods containing recycled polyethylene material), 279B.280 (Use of recycled products when economically feasible) or 279B.400 (Protests and judicial review of approvals of special procurements) to 279B.425 (Review of prequalification and debarment decisions), and no other section of this chapter or ORS chapter 279A provides judicial review.

(4) If a state contracting agency allegedly commits a violation, the Circuit Court for Marion County or the circuit court for the county in which the principal offices of the state contracting agency are located may review the alleged violation under ORS 183.484 (Jurisdiction for review of orders other than contested cases).

(5) If a local contracting agency allegedly commits a violation, the circuit court for the county in which the principal offices of the local contracting agency are located may review the alleged violation by means of a writ of review under ORS chapter 34.

(6) If a person gives the notice required under subsection (3)(e) of this section and timely seeks judicial review under this section, the contracting agency may not execute the contract unless the contracting agency determines that a compelling governmental interest exists in proceeding or that the goods and services are urgently needed. A contracting agency that makes such a determination shall set forth in writing the reasons for the determination and immediately provide the reasons to the person who filed the challenge. Thereafter, after joining the prospective contractor as a party to the litigation and upon motion by the person who filed the challenge, the court may nonetheless stay the performance of the contract if the court finds that the contracting agency’s determination that a compelling governmental interest exists in proceeding with contract execution, or the contracting agency’s determination that the goods or services were urgently needed, was not supported by substantial evidence or constituted a manifest abuse of discretion. In granting a stay, the court may require the person who sought the stay to post a bond in an amount sufficient to protect the contracting agency and the public from costs associated with a delay in contract performance.

(7) In a review, the circuit court shall give due deference to any factual contracting decision the contracting agency made and may not substitute the court’s judgment for the contracting agency’s judgment. The court shall review all questions of law de novo. Thereafter:

(a) If a contract has not been executed and the court rules in favor of the person that sought judicial review, and if the violation could have affected the award of the contract, the court shall remand the procurement to the contracting agency for a determination whether to continue with the procurement process in light of the court’s decision.

(b) In addition to the relief provided for in paragraph (a) of this subsection, if a contract has been executed and the court rules in favor of the person that sought judicial review, the court shall include in the court’s order a determination whether the party that signed the contract with the contracting agency is entitled to reimbursement under the conditions of, and calculated in the same manner as provided in, ORS 279C.470 (Compensation for contractor on contract declared void by court). Notwithstanding that ORS 279C.470 (Compensation for contractor on contract declared void by court) otherwise applies only to public improvement contracts, under this paragraph the court shall apply ORS 279C.470 (Compensation for contractor on contract declared void by court) to both public improvement contracts and other public contracts of contracting agencies.

(c) The court may award costs and attorney fees to the prevailing party. [2003 c.794 §86a; 2009 c.880 §8a; 2011 c.9 §33]


1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 279B—Public Contracting - Public Procurements, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors279B.­html (2015) (last ac­cessed Jul. 16, 2016).
 
2 OregonLaws.org contains the con­tents of Volume 21 of the ORS, inserted along­side the per­tin­ent statutes. See the preface to the ORS An­no­ta­tions for more information.
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.