2017 ORS 279A.225¹
Protests and disputes

(1) A protest regarding the procurement process, the contents of solicitation documents or the award or proposed award of an original contract may be directed only to the administering contracting agency. The protest must be in accordance with the provisions of ORS 279B.400 (Protests and judicial review of approvals of special procurements) to 279B.425 (Review of prequalification and debarment decisions).

(2) A protest regarding the use of a cooperative procurement by a purchasing contracting agency after the execution of an original contract may be directed only to the purchasing contracting agency. The protest must be in accordance with the provisions of ORS 279B.400 (Protests and judicial review of approvals of special procurements) to 279B.425 (Review of prequalification and debarment decisions) and is limited in scope to the purchasing contracting agency’s authority to enter into a cooperative procurement contract.

(3) The decision of a local contracting agency to use a cooperative procurement is reviewable in the circuit court of the county where the principal offices of the local contracting agency are located. The decision of a state contracting agency to use a cooperative procurement shall be reviewable by the Circuit Court for Marion County or the circuit court of the county where the principal offices of the state contracting agency are located.

(4) Disputes regarding contract performance between a purchasing contracting agency and a contractor may be resolved solely by the purchasing contracting agency and the contractor. [2003 c.794 §30]

1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 279A—General Provisions, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors279A.­html (2017) (last ac­cessed Mar. 30, 2018).
 
2 OregonLaws.org contains the con­tents of Volume 21 of the ORS, inserted along­side the per­tin­ent statutes. See the preface to the ORS An­no­ta­tions for more information.
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.