2017 ORS 267.230¹
Exemption from public utility or railroad regulation

(1) Except as provided in ORS 824.045 (Department establishment of state safety oversight program for rail fixed guideway public transportation system) and subsection (2) of this section, a transit system operated by a district, including the rates and charges made by a district and the equipment operated by a district, shall not be subject to state laws or ordinances of any political subdivision regulating public utilities or railroads, including those laws administered by the Department of Transportation.

(2) ORS 824.200 (Definitions for ORS 824.200 to 824.256) to 824.256 (Expense contributed by public held in trust by railroad company) apply to the transit system operated by a district except for control and regulation of any crossing at which the light rail transit vehicles of a district’s transit system cross a highway at separated grades or any grade crossing at which the light rail transit vehicles operate within and parallel to the right of way of a highway and where all conflicting vehicle movements are controlled by standard highway traffic devices. However, upon written request from the district and the public authority with jurisdiction over the highway at such a grade crossing, the department shall adjudicate any dispute that arises between the district and the public authority with regard to the grade crossing. [1969 c.643 §11; 1973 c.116 §5; 1977 c.420 §1; 1985 c.678 §7; 1995 c.733 §92; 2001 c.522 §10]

Atty. Gen. Opinions

Authority of mass transit district’s district board to refer ordinance to voters, (1979) Vol 40, p 167

1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 267—Mass Transit Districts; Transportation Districts, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors267.­html (2017) (last ac­cessed Mar. 30, 2018).
 
2 Legislative Counsel Committee, Annotations to the Oregon Revised Stat­utes, Cumulative Supplement - 2017, Chapter 267, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ano267.­html (2017) (last ac­cessed Mar. 30, 2018).
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.