2015 ORS 260.556¹
Secretary of State prohibited from counting petition signatures obtained by certain persons

The Secretary of State may not include in a count under ORS 250.045 (Prospective petition) (3) or 250.105 (Petition filing requirements) or ORS chapter 249 for purposes of determining whether an initiative, referendum or recall petition or a prospective petition for a state measure to be initiated contains the required number of signatures of electors, any signatures obtained by a person who the secretary determines, during the five-year period prior to the date the signatures were obtained:

(1) Has been convicted for a criminal offense involving fraud, forgery or identification theft in any state;

(2) Has had a civil penalty imposed under ORS 260.995 (Civil penalties) for a violation of ORS 250.048 (Registration and training for paid petition circulators) or 260.262 (Accounts of chief petitioners); or

(3) Has had a civil or criminal penalty imposed for violation of a statute subject to a criminal penalty under ORS 260.993 (Criminal penalties). [2009 c.533 §13]

Chapter 260

Atty. Gen. Opinions

Applica­tion to committee collecting contribu­tions to es­tab­lish fund to defray elected officials expenses incurred in performing po­lit­i­cal func­tions of office, (1980) Vol 40, p 11; preemp­tion by federal law of campaign financing with respect to federal candidates, (1981) Vol 41, p 420

Law Review Cita­tions

50 OLR 299-321 (1971); 55 OLR 253-266 (1976)


1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 260—Campaign Finance Regulation; Election Offenses, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors260.­html (2015) (last ac­cessed Jul. 16, 2016).
 
2 Legislative Counsel Committee, Annotations to the Oregon Revised Stat­utes, Cumulative Supplement - 2015, Chapter 260, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ano260.­html (2015) (last ac­cessed Jul. 16, 2016).
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.