2017 ORS 25.082¹
Administrative subpoenas
  • civil penalty
  • rules

(1) When services are being provided under Title IV-D of the Social Security Act, the enforcing agency of this or any other state may subpoena financial records and other information needed to establish parentage or to establish, modify or enforce a support order. The subpoena may be served on a party or on a public or private entity. Service of the subpoena may be by certified mail.

(2) A party or public or private entity that discloses information to the enforcing agency in compliance with a subpoena served under subsection (1) of this section is not liable to any person for any loss, damage or injury arising out of the disclosure.

(3) Upon request of an enforcing agency of another state, only a court or enforcing agency of Oregon may enforce a subpoena issued by the enforcing agency of the other state.

(4) Notwithstanding ORS 192.600 (Liability of financial institution for disclosure), a party or public or private entity that fails without good cause to comply with a subpoena issued under this section is subject to a civil penalty not to exceed $250. A civil penalty under this section must be imposed in the manner provided by ORS 183.745 (Civil penalty procedures).

(5) The Department of Justice shall adopt rules to implement the provisions of this section. [1997 c.746 §33; 2003 c.73 §21; 2017 c.651 §10]

Note: 25.082 (Administrative subpoenas) was enacted into law by the Legislative Assembly but was not added to or made a part of ORS chapter 25 or any series therein by legislative action. See Preface to Oregon Revised Statutes for further explanation.

1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 25—Support Enforcement, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors025.­html (2017) (last ac­cessed Mar. 30, 2018).
 
2 OregonLaws.org contains the con­tents of Volume 21 of the ORS, inserted along­side the per­tin­ent statutes. See the preface to the ORS An­no­ta­tions for more information.
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.