2017 ORS 238A.200¹
Actuarial equivalency factor tables

(1) Once every two calendar years, the Public Employees Retirement Board shall adopt actuarial equivalency factor tables for the purpose of computing the payments to be made to members of the pension program and their beneficiaries and alternate payees under ORS 238.465 (Benefits payable to others under certain judgments). The tables may be adopted in conjunction with the biennial evaluation of the Public Employees Retirement System required by ORS 238.605 (Actuarial report on system). Tables adopted under this section must use the best actuarial information on mortality available at the time the board adopts the tables, as provided by the actuary engaged by the board. Actuarial equivalency factor tables adopted under this section become effective on January 1 of the calendar year following adoption of the tables by the board. All computations of payments must use the actuarial equivalency factor tables that are in effect on:

(a) The effective date of retirement for any member or alternate payee;

(b) The date that the first payment is due for any person receiving a death benefit under ORS 238A.230 (Death benefit); or

(c) The date that the first payment is due after any recalculation of payments that is not attributable to error, including but not limited to recalculations under ORS 238.465 (Benefits payable to others under certain judgments) (2).

(2) The board may not defer or delay implementation of the actuarial equivalency factor tables adopted under this section. [2003 c.733 §22]

1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 238A—Oregon Public Service Retirement Plan, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors238A.­html (2017) (last ac­cessed Mar. 30, 2018).
 
2 OregonLaws.org contains the con­tents of Volume 21 of the ORS, inserted along­side the per­tin­ent statutes. See the preface to the ORS An­no­ta­tions for more information.
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.