2007 ORS 478.965¹
Recovery by district of costs of suppressing unlawful fire
  • attorney fees

(1) If the fire-fighting apparatus or personnel, or either of a district, are required to respond and be used actively or on a standby basis in connection with the extinguishment or control of a fire that has been started or allowed to spread in willful violation of ORS 478.960 (Burning of certain materials permitted only with permission of fire chief) (1) to (5), the person responsible therefor shall be liable to the district furnishing such apparatus or personnel, or both, for the actual costs incurred by the district in controlling, extinguishing or patrolling the fire. Such costs may be recovered in an action prosecuted in the name of the district. The court may award reasonable attorney fees to the district if the district prevails in an action under this section. The court may award reasonable attorney fees to a defendant who prevails in an action under this section if the court determines that the district had no objectively reasonable basis for asserting the claim or no reasonable basis for appealing an adverse decision of the trial court.

(2) An itemized statement of the actual costs incurred by the district, certified under oath by the treasurer of the district, shall be accepted as prima facie evidence of such costs in the action authorized by this section. [1967 c.420 §6; 1969 c.667 §58; 1981 c.897 §55; 1995 c.696 §24]

Chapter 478

Atty. Gen. Opinions

Propriety of office holding of a land owning nonresident elected director of a rural fire protec­tion district, (1975) Vol 37, p 873

Law Review Cita­tions

51 OLR 53 (1971)

1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 478—Rural Fire Protection Districts, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­478.­html (2007) (last ac­cessed Feb. 12, 2009).
 
2 Legislative Counsel Committee, Annotations to the Oregon Revised Stat­utes, Cumulative Supplement - 2007, Chapter 478, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­478ano.­htm (2007) (last ac­cessed Feb. 12, 2009).
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.