ORS 18.886¹
Creditor’s bond

(1) Before levying on personal property a sheriff may require that the judgment creditor file with the sheriff a good and sufficient bond or irrevocable letter of credit indemnifying the sheriff against any loss to the sheriff by reason of levying on or selling the property if:

(a) The sheriff has identified a specific person other than the judgment debtor who claims an interest in the property to be levied on; or

(b) The property is perishable.

(2) If a sheriff has reasonable doubt as to the ownership of personal property, or if any encumbrances are asserted against the property, the sheriff may require a bond or irrevocable letter of credit as described in subsection (1) of this section before levying on the property unless:

(a) The judgment creditor delivers to the sheriff a copy of a title document or report for the property issued by a state or federal agency that shows that the judgment debtor is the sole owner of the property; or

(b) If there is no title document for the property to be levied on, the judgment creditor delivers to the sheriff a record, prepared under ORS 79.0523 (UCC 9-523. Information from filing office) (4) by a filing office described in ORS 79.0501 (UCC 9-501. Filing office), showing that no financing statement or lien, or certificate or notice affecting a lien, is in effect for the property to be levied on.

(3) The sheriff may not require a bond or irrevocable letter of credit under this section if the writ of execution directs the sale or delivery of specific personal property pursuant to the terms of the judgment.

(4) A bond or irrevocable letter of credit under this section must be for double the amount of the value of the property to be levied on, as estimated by the sheriff. [2005 c.542 §12; 2007 c.166 §18]

1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 18—Judgments, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­Archive/­2007ors18.­pdf (2007) (last ac­cessed Feb. 12, 2009).
 
2 OregonLaws.org contains the con­tents of Volume 21 of the ORS, inserted along­side the per­tin­ent statutes. See the preface to the ORS An­no­ta­tions for more information.
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent. Currency Information