ORS 135.375¹
Pleading to other offenses

(1) As used in this section:

(a) "Initiating county" means the county in which the defendant appears for the purpose of entering a plea to a criminal charge.

(b) "Responding county" means a county in which another criminal charge is pending against the defendant entering a plea in the initiating county.

(2) Upon entry of a plea of guilty or no contest, or after conviction on a plea of not guilty, if a charge is pending against the defendant for a crime which is within the jurisdiction of a coordinate court of a responding county in the state, the defendant may state in writing that the defendant desires:

(a) To waive venue and trial in the responding county;

(b) To waive indictment by the grand jury of the responding county;

(c) To plead guilty or no contest; and

(d) To consent to disposition of the case by the court in the initiating county.

(3) Upon receipt of the request and the written approval of the district attorney of the initiating county, the clerk of the court shall forthwith transmit copies of the request and approval to the court and the district attorney of the responding county.

(4) Upon receipt of the papers described in subsection (3) of this section and the written approval of the district attorney of the responding county, the clerk of the court shall forthwith transmit certified copies of the papers in the proceeding to the court of the initiating county.

(5) Upon receipt of the papers described in subsection (4) of this section, the court may allow the defendant to enter the plea.

(6) The original judgment entered by the court of the initiating county shall be transmitted to the court of the responding county for filing. The judgment shall thereafter be considered, for all purposes, the same as a judgment of the court of the responding county. [1973 c.836 §165; 1991 c.111 §11]

1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 135—Arraignment and Pretrial Provisions, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­Archive/­2007ors135.­pdf (2007) (last ac­cessed Feb. 12, 2009).
 
2 OregonLaws.org contains the con­tents of Volume 21 of the ORS, inserted along­side the per­tin­ent statutes. See the preface to the ORS An­no­ta­tions for more information.
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent. Currency Information