2017 ORS 192.368¹
Nondisclosure on request of home address, home telephone number and electronic mail address
  • rules of procedure
  • duration of effect of request
  • liability
  • when not applicable

(1) An individual may submit a written request to a public body not to disclose a specified public record indicating the home address, personal telephone number or electronic mail address of the individual. A public body may not disclose the specified public record if the individual demonstrates to the satisfaction of the public body that the personal safety of the individual or the personal safety of a family member residing with the individual is in danger if the home address, personal telephone number or electronic mail address remains available for public inspection.

(2) The Attorney General shall adopt rules describing:

(a) The procedures for submitting the written request described in subsection (1) of this section.

(b) The evidence an individual shall provide to the public body to establish that disclosure of the home address, telephone number or electronic mail address of the individual would constitute a danger to personal safety. The evidence may include but is not limited to evidence that the individual or a family member residing with the individual has:

(A) Been a victim of domestic violence;

(B) Obtained an order issued under ORS 133.055 (Criminal citation);

(C) Contacted a law enforcement officer involving domestic violence or other physical abuse;

(D) Obtained a temporary restraining order or other no contact order to protect the individual from future physical abuse; or

(E) Filed other criminal or civil legal proceedings regarding physical protection.

(c) The procedures for submitting the written notification from the individual that disclosure of the home address, personal telephone number or electronic mail address of the individual no longer constitutes a danger to personal safety.

(3) A request described in subsection (1) of this section remains effective:

(a) Until the public body receives a written request for termination but no later than five years after the date that a public body receives the request; or

(b) In the case of a voter registration record, until the individual must update the individual’s voter registration, at which time the individual may apply for another exemption from disclosure.

(4) A public body may disclose a home address, personal telephone number or electronic mail address of an individual exempt from disclosure under subsection (1) of this section upon court order, on request from any law enforcement agency or with the consent of the individual.

(5) A public body may not be held liable for granting or denying an exemption from disclosure under this section or any other unauthorized release of a home address, personal telephone number or electronic mail address granted an exemption from disclosure under this section.

(6) This section does not apply to county property and lien records. [Formerly 192.445]

Note: 192.368 (Nondisclosure on request of home address, home telephone number and electronic mail address) was added to and made a part of 192.311 (Definitions for ORS 192.311 to 192.478) to 192.478 (Exemption for Judicial Department) by legislative action but was not added to any smaller series therein. See Preface to Oregon Revised Statutes for further explanation.

Chapter 192

Atty. Gen. Opinions

Attorney General’s Public Meetings and Records Manual, (1973) Vol 36, p 543; public meetings and records manual, (1976) Vol 37, p 1087; pro­hi­bi­­tion on disclosing marriage records, (1998) Vol 49, p 21

1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 192—Records; Public Reports and Meetings, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors192.­html (2017) (last ac­cessed Mar. 30, 2018).
 
2 Legislative Counsel Committee, Annotations to the Oregon Revised Stat­utes, Cumulative Supplement - 2017, Chapter 192, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ano192.­html (2017) (last ac­cessed Mar. 30, 2018).
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.