2017 ORS 192.235¹
Policy for ORS 192.230 to 192.250

(1) The Legislative Assembly finds that:

(a) Many state agency reports are published for reasons that are historical and no longer based on the public’s need to be informed.

(b) The format of many state agency reports is not economical or well suited to providing needed information in easily understandable form.

(c) State agency reports containing information that is useful but not to the general public should be placed on a self-supporting schedule.

(2) It is the policy of the Legislative Assembly to encourage state agencies to inform the public, the Legislative Assembly and the Governor of matters of public interest and concern. It is further the policy of this state to guarantee to its citizens the right to know about the activities of their government, to benefit from the information developed by state agencies at public expense and to enjoy equal access to the information services of state agencies. It is further state policy to encourage agencies to consider whether needed information is most effectively and economically presented by means of printed reports. [1991 c.842 §2]

Note: See note under 192.230 (Definitions for ORS 192.235 to 192.245).

Chapter 192

Atty. Gen. Opinions

Attorney General’s Public Meetings and Records Manual, (1973) Vol 36, p 543; public meetings and records manual, (1976) Vol 37, p 1087; pro­hi­bi­­tion on disclosing marriage records, (1998) Vol 49, p 21

1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 192—Records; Public Reports and Meetings, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors192.­html (2017) (last ac­cessed Mar. 30, 2018).
 
2 Legislative Counsel Committee, Annotations to the Oregon Revised Stat­utes, Cumulative Supplement - 2017, Chapter 192, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ano192.­html (2017) (last ac­cessed Mar. 30, 2018).
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.