2017 ORS 182.525¹
Mandatory expenditures for evidence-based programs
  • biennial report
  • rules

(1) An agency shall spend at least 75 percent of state moneys that the agency receives for programs on evidence-based programs.

(2) The agency shall submit a biennial report containing:

(a) An assessment of each program on which the agency expends funds, including but not limited to whether the program is an evidence-based program;

(b) The percentage of state moneys the agency receives for programs that is being expended on evidence-based programs;

(c) The percentage of federal and other moneys the agency receives for programs that is being expended on evidence-based programs; and

(d) A description of the efforts the agency is making to meet the requirement of subsection (1) of this section.

(3) The agency shall submit the report required by subsection (2) of this section no later than September 30 of each even-numbered year to the interim legislative committee dealing with judicial matters.

(4) If an agency, in any biennium, spends more than 25 percent of the state moneys that the agency receives for programs on programs that are not evidence based, the Legislative Assembly shall consider the agency’s failure to meet the requirement of subsection (1) of this section in making appropriations to the agency for the following biennium.

(5) An agency may adopt rules necessary to carry out the provisions of this section. [2003 c.669 §7; 2005 c.22 §128; 2005 c.503 §13; 2013 c.649 §44]

Note: See note under 182.515 (Definitions for ORS 182.515 and 182.525).

1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 182—State Administrative Agencies, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors182.­html (2017) (last ac­cessed Mar. 30, 2018).
 
2 OregonLaws.org contains the con­tents of Volume 21 of the ORS, inserted along­side the per­tin­ent statutes. See the preface to the ORS An­no­ta­tions for more information.
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.