2017 ORS 181A.530¹
Certification of parole and probation officers

(1) Except for a person who has requested and obtained an extension from the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training pursuant to subsection (2) of this section, a person may not be employed as a parole and probation officer for more than 18 months unless the person is a citizen of the United States or a nonimmigrant legally admitted to the United States under a Compact of Free Association, and:

(a) The person has been certified as being qualified as a parole and probation officer under provisions of ORS 181A.355 (Definitions for ORS 181A.355 to 181A.670) to 181A.670 (Disclosure of information about public safety officer) and the certification has not lapsed or been revoked pursuant to ORS 181A.630 (Procedure for denial, suspension or revocation of application or certification), 181A.640 (Grounds for denial, suspension or revocation of application or certification of person or accreditation of program) and 181A.650 (Judicial review of department’s final order) (1) and not reissued under ORS 181A.650 (Judicial review of department’s final order) (2); or

(b) The person is exempted from the certification requirement under ORS 181A.420 (Minimum standards and training requirements inapplicable to certain persons) (1) and (2).

(2) The department, upon the facts contained in an affidavit accompanying the request for an extension, may find good cause for failure to obtain certification within the time period described in subsection (1) of this section. If the department finds that there is good cause for failure to timely obtain certification, the department may extend for up to one year the period that a person may serve as a parole and probation officer without certification. The grant or denial of an extension is within the sole discretion of the department.

(3) The certification of a parole and probation officer shall lapse upon the passage of more than three consecutive months during which period the officer is not employed as a parole and probation officer, unless the officer is on leave from a law enforcement unit. Upon reemployment as a parole and probation officer, the person whose certification has lapsed may apply for certification in the manner provided in ORS 181A.355 (Definitions for ORS 181A.355 to 181A.670) to 181A.670 (Disclosure of information about public safety officer).

(4) In order to maintain certification, a parole and probation officer who is employed part-time must complete annually at least 20 hours of continuing education approved by the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training.

(5) The requirement of citizenship imposed under subsection (1) of this section does not apply to a person employed as a parole and probation officer on September 27, 1987, who continues to serve as a parole and probation officer. [Formerly 181.653; 2017 c.53 §4]

(formerly 181.653)

Notes of Decisions

Duties of parole and proba­tion of­fi­cer requiring certifica­tion include both duties contained in [former] ORS 181.610 defini­tion of parole and proba­tion of­fi­cer and duties de­scribed in ORS chapter 137. FOPPO v. Washington County, 142 Or App 252, 920 P2d 1141 (1996), Sup Ct review denied

Under 1997 version of statute, noncertified employee performing ministerial tasks at direc­tion and under supervision of parole and proba­tion of­fi­cer is not employed as parole and proba­tion of­fi­cer. Multnomah County Employees Union v. Multnomah County, 176 Or App 323, 31 P3d 499 (2001)

1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 181A—State Police; Crime Reporting and Records; Public Safety Standards and Training; Private Security Services, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors181A.­html (2017) (last ac­cessed Mar. 30, 2018).
 
2 Legislative Counsel Committee, Annotations to the Oregon Revised Stat­utes, Cumulative Supplement - 2017, Chapter 181A, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ano181A.­html (2017) (last ac­cessed Mar. 30, 2018).
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.