2015 ORS 181A.405¹
Legislative intent and findings

(1) It is the intent of the Legislative Assembly in creating the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training to provide for the coordination of training programs for police officers, certified reserve officers, corrections officers and parole and probation officers and to set standards.

(2) The Legislative Assembly finds that:

(a) Providing high quality training for public safety personnel enhances the quality of public safety services provided to communities, contributes significantly to the safety of public safety officers and reduces state, local and individual liability;

(b) Basic training for public safety personnel provides a consistent foundation of best practices knowledge and skills necessary for public safety officers throughout the state;

(c) Advanced, leadership and continuing training preserve and build on the knowledge and skills acquired during basic training, ensuring that communities continue to have well-trained professional public safety officers;

(d) Advanced, leadership and continuing training should be consistent with recognized best practices while meeting specific local needs; and

(e) Course and instructor accreditation help to ensure that advanced, leadership and continuing training programs are consistent with recognized best practices and are legally sufficient.

(3) The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training may continue to accredit advanced, leadership and continuing training courses and programs consistent with ORS 181A.590 (Certification of instructors). [Subsection (1) formerly 181.700; subsections (2) and (3) formerly 181.639]


1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 181A—State Police; Crime Reporting and Records; Public Safety Standards and Training; Private Security Services, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors181A.­html (2015) (last ac­cessed Jul. 16, 2016).
 
2 OregonLaws.org contains the con­tents of Volume 21 of the ORS, inserted along­side the per­tin­ent statutes. See the preface to the ORS An­no­ta­tions for more information.
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.