2017 ORS 18.930¹
Conduct of sale generally
  • county fee

(1) The sheriff shall conduct an execution sale by public oral auction. The sale must be conducted between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. All property shall be sold by the sheriff in such parcels as are likely to bring the highest price. Any portion of real property belonging to a person other than the judgment debtor must be sold separately if the person requests a separate sale.

(2) At least 10 days before the date first set for an execution sale, a judgment creditor must provide the sheriff with any report for real property to be sold at the execution sale that is in the possession of the judgment creditor and that shows interests of record in the property. The sheriff shall make the report available to bidders who appear at the sale. No civil action may be brought against a title company, the judgment creditor, the sheriff or any other person by reason of omissions or errors in the report, and the validity of the sale is not affected by reason of any omissions or errors in the report.

(3) A judgment creditor that is a public body, as defined in ORS 174.109 (“Public body” defined), may set a minimum bid amount for property to be sold at an execution sale.

(4) Tangible personal property to be sold at an execution sale must be present at the place where the sale is conducted unless the property is not in the possession of the sheriff.

(5) The county may establish a fee to be collected by the sheriff at the time of sale. The amount of the fee shall be established by the governing body of the county and may not be greater than the amount necessary to pay the county for the expenses incurred by the county for giving notice of the sale and conducting the sale and for the anticipated expenses for any notices required to be given after the sale and other post-sale administration of the sale.

(6) A person who purchases real property that is subject to redemption at an execution sale must provide the sheriff with an address to which a redemption notice may be sent and must notify the sheriff of any change in address until the purchaser transfers the purchaser’s interest in the property, the property is redeemed or the time allowed for redemption expires, whichever occurs first. Any person who thereafter acquires the purchaser’s interest in the property must notify the sheriff of the transfer, provide the sheriff with an address to which a redemption notice may be sent and notify the sheriff of any change in address until there is a another transfer, the property is redeemed or the time allowed for redemption expires, whichever occurs first.

(7) At any time before the sheriff conducts an execution sale for personal property, the judgment debtor may pay to the sheriff the full amount owing on the judgment as of the date the payment is made along with the costs of sale as described in ORS 18.950 (Delivery and distribution of proceeds) (2). The payment must be made in United States currency. If payment is made under this subsection, the sheriff may not sell the property, and shall deliver the property to the debtor. The sheriff shall deliver the amount paid by the judgment debtor to the court administrator with the sheriff’s return on the writ. The sheriff is not liable to any person by reason of accepting payment under the provisions of this subsection. [2005 c.542 §25; 2007 c.580 §2; 2011 c.195 §14]

Chapter 18

Notes of Decisions

If terms used by trial court suffice to convey court’s concluding decision or decisions, and if terms are set forth in docu­ment properly titled as judg­ment, then judg­ment docu­ment contains judg­ment. Interstate Roofing, Inc. v. Springfield Corp., 347 Or 144, 218 P3d 113 (2009)

1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 18—Judgments, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors018.­html (2017) (last ac­cessed Mar. 30, 2018).
 
2 Legislative Counsel Committee, Annotations to the Oregon Revised Stat­utes, Cumulative Supplement - 2017, Chapter 18, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ano018.­html (2017) (last ac­cessed Mar. 30, 2018).
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.