2015 ORS 164.160¹
Definitions

As used in this section and ORS 164.162 (Mail theft or receipt of stolen mail):

(1) "Authorized depository" means a mailbox, post office box or rural box used by postal customers to deposit outgoing mail or used by the Postal Service to deliver incoming mail.

(2) "Mail" means any letter, card, parcel or other material that:

(a) Is sent or delivered by means of the Postal Service;

(b) Has postage affixed by the postal customer or Postal Service or has been accepted for delivery by the Postal Service; and

(c) Is placed in any authorized depository or mail receptacle or given to any Postal Service employee for delivery.

(3) "Mail receptacle" means any location used by the Postal Service or postal customers to place outgoing mail or receive incoming mail.

(4) "Postage" means a Postal Service stamp, permit imprint, meter strip or other authorized indication of prepayment for service provided or authorized by the Postal Service for collection and delivery of mail.

(5) "Postal Service" means the United States Postal Service. [1999 c.920 §1]

Note: 164.160 (Definitions), 164.162 (Mail theft or receipt of stolen mail) and 164.164 (Defense in prosecution under ORS 164.162) were enacted into law by the Legislative Assembly but were not added to or made a part of ORS chapter 164 or any series therein by legislative action. See Preface to Oregon Revised Statutes for further explanation.

Chapter 164

Law Review Cita­tions

51 OLR 427-637 (1972)


1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 164—Offenses Against Property, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors164.­html (2015) (last ac­cessed Jul. 16, 2016).
 
2 Legislative Counsel Committee, Annotations to the Oregon Revised Stat­utes, Cumulative Supplement - 2015, Chapter 164, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ano164.­html (2015) (last ac­cessed Jul. 16, 2016).
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.