2015 ORS 163.577¹
Failing to supervise a child

(1) A person commits the offense of failing to supervise a child if the person is the parent, lawful guardian or other person lawfully charged with the care or custody of a child under 15 years of age and the child:

(a) Commits an act that brings the child within the jurisdiction of the juvenile court under ORS 419C.005 (Jurisdiction);

(b) Violates a curfew law of a county or any other political subdivision; or

(c) Fails to attend school as required under ORS 339.010 (School attendance required).

(2) Nothing in this section applies to a child-caring agency as defined in ORS 418.205 (Definitions for ORS 418.205 to 418.310 and 418.992 to 418.998) or to foster parents.

(3) In a prosecution of a person for failing to supervise a child under subsection (1)(a) of this section, it is an affirmative defense that the person:

(a) Is the victim of the act that brings the child within the jurisdiction of the juvenile court; or

(b) Reported the act to the appropriate authorities.

(4) In a prosecution of a person for failing to supervise a child under subsection (1) of this section, it is an affirmative defense that the person took reasonable steps to control the conduct of the child at the time the person is alleged to have failed to supervise the child.

(5)(a) Except as provided in subsection (6) or (7) of this section, in a prosecution of a person for failing to supervise a child under subsection (1)(a) of this section, the court shall order the person to pay restitution under ORS 137.103 (Definitions for ORS 137.101 to 137.109) to 137.109 (Effect of restitution order on other remedies of victim) to a victim for economic damages arising from the act of the child that brings the child within the jurisdiction of the juvenile court.

(b) The amount of restitution ordered under this subsection may not exceed $2,500.

(6) If a person pleads guilty or is found guilty of failing to supervise a child under this section and if the person has not previously been convicted of failing to supervise a child, the court:

(a) Shall warn the person of the penalty for future convictions of failing to supervise a child and shall suspend imposition of sentence.

(b) May not order the person to pay restitution under this section.

(7)(a) If a person pleads guilty or is found guilty of failing to supervise a child under this section and if the person has only one prior conviction for failing to supervise a child, the court, with the consent of the person, may suspend imposition of sentence and order the person to complete a parent effectiveness program approved by the court. Upon the person’s completion of the parent effectiveness program to the satisfaction of the court, the court may discharge the person. If the person fails to complete the parent effectiveness program to the satisfaction of the court, the court may impose a sentence authorized by this section.

(b) There may be only one suspension of sentence under this subsection with respect to a person.

(8) The juvenile court has jurisdiction over a first offense of failing to supervise a child under this section.

(9) Failing to supervise a child is a Class A violation. [1995 c.593 §1; 1999 c.1051 §154; 2003 c.670 §5; 2005 c.564 §8]

Note: 163.577 (Failing to supervise a child) was enacted into law by the Legislative Assembly but was not added to or made a part of ORS chapter 163 or any series therein by legislative action. See Preface to Oregon Revised Statutes for further explanation.

Law Review Cita­tions

75 OLR 829 (1996); 80 OLR 1 (2001)

Chapter 163

Law Review Cita­tions

51 OLR 427-637 (1972)


1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 163—Offenses Against Persons, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors163.­html (2015) (last ac­cessed Jul. 16, 2016).
 
2 Legislative Counsel Committee, Annotations to the Oregon Revised Stat­utes, Cumulative Supplement - 2015, Chapter 163, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ano163.­html (2015) (last ac­cessed Jul. 16, 2016).
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.