2015 ORS 163.192¹
Endangering a person protected by a Family Abuse Prevention Act restraining order

(1) A person commits the crime of endangering a person protected by a Family Abuse Prevention Act restraining order if the person:

(a) Has been served with the order as provided in ORS 107.718 (Restraining order), unless service was waived under ORS 107.720 (Enforcement of restraining orders) because the person appeared before the court;

(b) Intentionally engaged in conduct prohibited by the order while the order was in effect; and

(c) By engaging in the prohibited conduct, recklessly created a substantial risk of physical injury to a person protected by the order, or intentionally attempted to place a person protected by the order in fear of imminent physical injury.

(2) Endangering a person protected by a Family Abuse Prevention Act restraining order is a Class C felony. [2015 c.527 §2]

Note: 163.192 (Endangering a person protected by a Family Abuse Prevention Act restraining order) was added to and made a part of 163.160 (Assault in the fourth degree) to 163.208 (Assaulting a public safety officer) by legislative action but was not added to any smaller series therein. See Preface to Oregon Revised Statutes for further explanation.

Notes of Decisions

Where state relied on precisely same act to es­tab­lish "use-physical-force" ele­ment of robbery and "cause-physical-injury" ele­ment of assault, defendant's assault con­vic­­tion merged into robbery con­vic­­tion. State v. Steele, 33 Or App 491, 577 P2d 524 (1978), Sup Ct review denied

Law Review Cita­tions

51 OLR 429, 432, 482-486 (1972)

Chapter 163

Law Review Cita­tions

51 OLR 427-637 (1972)


1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 163—Offenses Against Persons, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors163.­html (2015) (last ac­cessed Jul. 16, 2016).
 
2 Legislative Counsel Committee, Annotations to the Oregon Revised Stat­utes, Cumulative Supplement - 2015, Chapter 163, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ano163.­html (2015) (last ac­cessed Jul. 16, 2016).
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.