2017 ORS 125.815¹
Definitions
  • significant-connection factors

(1) As used in ORS 125.815 (Definitions) to 125.835 (Proceedings in more than one state):

(a) “Emergency” means a circumstance described in ORS 125.600 (In general) (1), and for which the appointment of a guardian is necessary because no other person has authority and is willing to act on the respondent’s behalf.

(b) “Home state” means the state in which the respondent was physically present, including any period of temporary absence, for at least six consecutive months immediately before the filing of a petition for a conservatorship order or the appointment of a guardian, or if none, the state in which the respondent was physically present, including any period of temporary absence, for at least six consecutive months ending within the six months prior to the filing of the petition.

(c) “Significant-connection state” means a state, other than the home state, with which a respondent has a significant connection other than mere physical presence and in which substantial evidence concerning the respondent is available.

(2) In determining under ORS 125.820 (Jurisdiction) and 125.837 (Transfer of guardianship or conservatorship to another state) (5) whether a respondent has a significant connection with a particular state, the court shall consider:

(a) The location of the respondent’s family and other persons required to be notified of the guardianship or conservatorship proceeding;

(b) The length of time the respondent at any time was physically present in the state and the duration of any absence;

(c) The location of the respondent’s property; and

(d) The extent to which the respondent has ties to the state such as voting registration, state or local tax return filing, vehicle registration, driver license, social relationship and receipt of services. [2009 c.179 §7]

Note: See note under 125.800 (Short title).

1 Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 125—Protective Proceedings, https://­www.­oregonlegislature.­gov/­bills_laws/­ors/­ors125.­html (2017) (last ac­cessed Mar. 30, 2018).
 
2 OregonLaws.org contains the con­tents of Volume 21 of the ORS, inserted along­side the per­tin­ent statutes. See the preface to the ORS An­no­ta­tions for more information.
 
3 OregonLaws.org assembles these lists by analyzing references between Sections. Each listed item refers back to the current Section in its own text. The result reveals relationships in the code that may not have otherwise been apparent.